Tag Archives: thirty year’s war

Documentary: Battle of Lützen – 1632

The Thirty Years War is my era of choice when it comes to research and persona portrayal. I stumbled across this great little documentary about the Battle of Lützen (1632) where Gustavus Adolphus was fatally shot.

It’s got some nice research and amazing animation, showing what happened in the battle. It surrounds mostly mass burial grounds at the battle site, and how the soldiers died.

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Caliver vs. Cavalier: What’s the Dif?

In the SCA I have a French cavalier persona. I also started the Carolingian Caliver Company, a baronial fencing unit here in the Boston-area of the East Kingdom.

This has become humorously problematic as the number one mistake/mix up I run into with my fellow SCAdians is that they call the “Carolingian Calivers” the “Carolingian Cavaliers.” The mix up is understandable, though I sometimes wonder if people think I’m misspelling my fencing unit’s name when I write “Calivers.”

Regardless,  I figure I’d do a quick post to explain the difference between the two. Most people I run into know what a cavalier is, but are fuzzy about what a caliver is.

But because just because they’re spelled similarly, they’re very different things. Continue reading Caliver vs. Cavalier: What’s the Dif?

Pictorial: The Carolingian Caliver Company standard

This was originally posted on JMAucoin.com in February 2015.

Last spring one of my fellow SCA fencers came up to me saying he wanted to be the standard-bearer for our fencing unit, the Carolingian Caliver Company.

I loved the idea. The only problem was that I had no clue how to make a silk banner or flag.

Fortunately, in the SCA if there’s something you want to learn there’s a really, really good chance there’s already someone with the know-how in the society. More fortunately, that fellow was Sir Antonio and he was teaching a silk banner making class at one of my local events. We got to make small little banners, but I’ll save you all from having to see my first attempt. But it was a great class with a handy review sheet that I would use later on. Continue reading Pictorial: The Carolingian Caliver Company standard