Tag Archives: English Civil War

East Kingdom Rapier Army Officer Commissions Project

This is my second year as General of the East Kingdom Rapier Army and I wanted to do something special for my immediate staff who put in a lot of hard work and effort over the year as well as during Pennsic. They take time out of their vacation to deal with me, do bunch of Woods Walks, come to a ton of meetings, etc. Being on Command Staff is fun but it’s also work that takes one away from other Pennsic fun.

Last year I “paid” my staff with replica French coins that I bought at a vendor at Pennsic. This year I decided to write officer commissions to official recognize their role on my command staff and as leaders in the East Kingdom Rapier Army.

Continue reading East Kingdom Rapier Army Officer Commissions Project

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Replicating 17th Century Cavalry (Cavalier) Spurs

Finally completed my 17th Century-esque spurs!

17th Century replica spurs

I’ve been looking into spurs for a few years now, but I haven’t been able to find 17th Century accurate spurs anywhere. Not even UK-based English Civil War reenacting shops have them. I did find some nice 15th Century spurs from Raymond’s Quiet Press while at Pennsic this year, so I picked those up and some sweet 1/2″ buckles that match pretty well.

Fifteenth Century spurs are different than 17th Century spurs in a few ways. Continue reading Replicating 17th Century Cavalry (Cavalier) Spurs

17th Century Buff Coat: Quickie Update

Just a quickie update. Spent the evening dry rubbing the dark yellow ochre dye powder into my leather for the buff coat replication. I went into more detail into the dye and method here. I tried to use the bare minimal so there’s not a lot of extra powder that’ll go everywhere. I may take a brush to it later to help.

But it’s all done except for the collar — which I have yet to cut out.

Here’s a before and after look.

buffcoat-yellow-ochre

17th Century buff coat: Getting the right color (test dyes)

Next to the signature raised “ridges” in the buff coat seams that come from the butt-end stitching, the next most noticeable characteristic (and arguably the most noticeable) is that golden brown hue of the leather, as seen below.

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Some extant examples are a little more brown or grey, but this gives you the general idea of the look. This golden brown coloration is a byproduct of the tanning process. Tanners would “oil tan” the leather with lime and scrape the surface to remove the outer layer. This is what gives the buff coat that rough, unfinished look. Cod oil was used in a process called “kicking.” I’ve also read that yellow ochre was used to help get the color. Continue reading 17th Century buff coat: Getting the right color (test dyes)

Caliver vs. Cavalier: What’s the Dif?

In the SCA I have a French cavalier persona. I also started the Carolingian Caliver Company, a baronial fencing unit here in the Boston-area of the East Kingdom.

This has become humorously problematic as the number one mistake/mix up I run into with my fellow SCAdians is that they call the “Carolingian Calivers” the “Carolingian Cavaliers.” The mix up is understandable, though I sometimes wonder if people think I’m misspelling my fencing unit’s name when I write “Calivers.”

Regardless,  I figure I’d do a quick post to explain the difference between the two. Most people I run into know what a cavalier is, but are fuzzy about what a caliver is.

But because just because they’re spelled similarly, they’re very different things. Continue reading Caliver vs. Cavalier: What’s the Dif?