Tag Archives: 17th Century

.72 Caliber Matchlock Musket [VIDEO]

It’s Friday night and I’m doing laundry, so I have some clean garb for Smoking Rocks Investiture tomorrow. I just stumbled across this cool video from IraqVeteran8888 on the 17th Century matchlock musket. They do a pretty decent job going over the big picture of the weapon and how it changed warfare.

Thanks to these guys, I now have another vendor for my future musket needs.

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Documentary: Battle of Lützen – 1632

The Thirty Years War is my era of choice when it comes to research and persona portrayal. I stumbled across this great little documentary about the Battle of Lützen (1632) where Gustavus Adolphus was fatally shot.

It’s got some nice research and amazing animation, showing what happened in the battle. It surrounds mostly mass burial grounds at the battle site, and how the soldiers died.

Class Notes: ‘Abridged’ Capo Ferro

The following is the handout and notes from my “Abridged Capo Ferro” class, based off Capo Ferro’s manual, but more specifically, a drill/video by the talented Guy Windsor. Additional and great resources are listed at the end of the post.

This a constant work-in-progress. You can download a PDF version here.


 

Goal: To teach the basic techniques of “what counters what” in Capoferro’s rapier system. This is based off a drill created by Guy Windsor. Video of the drill can be seen below.

The Basis: Skilled Italian fencers know to stringer (constrain) their opponent’s blade before attacking. Doing this limits their opponent’s options of attack. The most common attack after being stringered is a thrust by ways of a cavazione (disengage).

This makes our opponent’s predictable. This is good for us! Continue reading Class Notes: ‘Abridged’ Capo Ferro

EK Provost Collar/17th Century ‘Chain of Office’

As noted in a previous post, I became Master Donovan’s provost (see: fencing squire). He gave me a sweet blue leather collar with pewter hardware — similar to what some of the EK MoD’s have but in white.

Because of the hardware, I didn’t want to be wearing that at K&Q Rapier Champs or other fencing events. I’m afraid it’ll take a hit and break. Of course, the simple solution is “just don’t get hit” but simple =/= easy. So I wanted to make a “fighting collar.” It also gave me an excuse to whip up something that’s more in line with my 17th Century persona.

Very late in SCA period and beyond, the chains of offices slowly lost their chains and were replaced by fancy silk bands. This was my basis for the design. Super simple and easy. And like with my fancier provost collar, we put an EK Populace badge on it. The silk came by way of my fencing sister Alesone via Master Donovan.

East Kingdom Provost Collar
Right: Portrait of Robert Devereux (1565-1601), Earl of Essex; Left: my provost collar version

Replicating 17th Century Cavalry (Cavalier) Spurs

Finally completed my 17th Century-esque spurs!

17th Century replica spurs

I’ve been looking into spurs for a few years now, but I haven’t been able to find 17th Century accurate spurs anywhere. Not even UK-based English Civil War reenacting shops have them. I did find some nice 15th Century spurs from Raymond’s Quiet Press while at Pennsic this year, so I picked those up and some sweet 1/2″ buckles that match pretty well.

Fifteenth Century spurs are different than 17th Century spurs in a few ways. Continue reading Replicating 17th Century Cavalry (Cavalier) Spurs

17th Century Buff Coat: Quickie Update

Just a quickie update. Spent the evening dry rubbing the dark yellow ochre dye powder into my leather for the buff coat replication. I went into more detail into the dye and method here. I tried to use the bare minimal so there’s not a lot of extra powder that’ll go everywhere. I may take a brush to it later to help.

But it’s all done except for the collar — which I have yet to cut out.

Here’s a before and after look.

buffcoat-yellow-ochre

17th Century buff coat: Getting the right color (test dyes)

Next to the signature raised “ridges” in the buff coat seams that come from the butt-end stitching, the next most noticeable characteristic (and arguably the most noticeable) is that golden brown hue of the leather, as seen below.

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Some extant examples are a little more brown or grey, but this gives you the general idea of the look. This golden brown coloration is a byproduct of the tanning process. Tanners would “oil tan” the leather with lime and scrape the surface to remove the outer layer. This is what gives the buff coat that rough, unfinished look. Cod oil was used in a process called “kicking.” I’ve also read that yellow ochre was used to help get the color. Continue reading 17th Century buff coat: Getting the right color (test dyes)