It’s Hardest To See Your Progress Through a Mask

I know sometimes my sword-friends get frustrated with their skill development. Been there. Still there some days.

So here’s a little reminder. It’s hardest to see your progress through a mask.

When you get better the people around you get better. You make them better and, in turn, they make you better. It’s a leap-frogging cycle that makes measuring your progress frustrating at best and disheartening at worst.

But it’s so worth it for when things click. It’s worth it to prove to yourself that you can.

So when you feel that frustration build to a boil, take off your mask. Step away from the lists. Get feedback from people you trust. Tell the self-doubt to fuck off. And keep grinding away at those XPs.

The Bomb-Kitty Award

Everyone likes to win in melee. Everyone wants to be the hero. Be the guy or gal who d’Artagnan’s their way through the opposition, slicing them up like bread to be handed out at dinner time.

The Calivers, of course, want this as well. We work hard to try to be that group. But there’s something else we teach. Something we work on and love to celebrate — a glorious death.

die
Worf is our patron saint

A couple of months back we handed out the first Bomb-Kitty Award for “melee prowess.” It went to Eon, one of our newer members, but well deserving of the award.

The award requirement itself can be summed up with the phrase “Your life meant nothing, but your death meant everything.”
Continue reading The Bomb-Kitty Award

Capo Ferro Chapter XI: How to Seek Measure

You can find links to all the chapters I’ve interpreted in the Historical Fencing section of the site.

I’m using two translations as my sources. The Swanger/Wilson translation of Capo Ferro’s book (download it here) and Tom Leoni’s version. Both are solid, but have weird translation issues that make more sense when each version is compared to one another. It helps to get a rounder view of the material.

In this section, we look at how to seek measure (which is to get into a position to be able to strike your opponent) while remaining safe from being struck yourself. Continue reading Capo Ferro Chapter XI: How to Seek Measure

Capo Ferro Chapter X: The Defense & the Guard

You can find links to all the chapters I’ve interpreted in the Historical Fencing section of the site.

I’m using two translations as my sources. The Swanger/Wilson translation of Capo Ferro’s book (download it here) and Tom Leoni’s version. Both are solid, but have weird translation issues that make more sense when each version is compared to one another. It helps to get a rounder view of the material.

This chapter we start to get a little more into the hows. We’ve spent a lot of time on theory/philosophy and a bit on body posture. This chapter looks at the guard — specifically your “on guard” guard. Continue reading Capo Ferro Chapter X: The Defense & the Guard

The [Brief] History of the Carolingian Calivers

It’s funny to look back and see how far you and your friends have come.

When I started the Carolingian Calivers with my buddy Duncan about six years back, we had a simple goal: To create a rapier unit that specialized in RBG tactics, and to build a group that could fight together and train together.

An Idea Conceived

Duncan & I after the Calivers were officially chartered into the barony
Duncan & I after the Calivers were officially chartered into the barony

The RBG angle might seem a bit odd, but it stemmed from a battle at GNEW about six years back (give or take). I was put on the run squad and my objective was to get to the opposite end of the ship and block our enemies from boarding, so the slower runners behind us could get all the gold for our team.

I sprinted my tiny little ass off and got there first. Barreling toward me on the other side was Don Wyatt, armed with his usual sword and buckler. I knew I was more or less toast, but the longer I could hold out the better for my team. When he got a few paces away he stopped. But instead of raising his sword, he lowered his buckler, revealing a loaded pistol.

Fu-ling!

Continue reading The [Brief] History of the Carolingian Calivers

Capo Ferro Chapter IX: The Thighs, the Legs, the Feet, and the Stance

Today’s all about the legs.

squatmas

You can find links to all the chapters I’ve interpreted in the Historical Fencing section of the site.

I’m using two translations as my sources. The Swanger/Wilson translation of Capo Ferro’s book (download it here) and Tom Leoni’s version. Both are solid, but have weird translation issues that make more sense when each version is compared to one another. It helps to get a rounder view of the material. Continue reading Capo Ferro Chapter IX: The Thighs, the Legs, the Feet, and the Stance

Researching swords, gonnes and garb during the 16th and 17th Centuries.